Thursday, July 16, 2015

Cannabis effective for autistic kids, PTSD but not in South Dakota

Exposure to genetically engineered organisms is believed to be a vector for the development of autism in afflicted foetuses but while some parents of autistic kids want politics to treat symptoms, some want results.
“Let’s say a new patient is an 11-year-old boy, weighs 75 pounds and suffers with severe non-verbal autism. The ACT Now software allows us to track patient-driven data in a HIPAA-compliant, cloud-based platform, so the physician or consultant can compare cannabinoid sequencing charts from a global database of matching patient conditions. “To make the medicine available to a wider population, we needed to take the project out of Colorado, because we couldn’t transport medication across state lines. That’s why we’re here in Ukiah,” says Chad Ruby, COO of United Cannabis. [Ukiah Daily Journal]
But in South Dakota quibbling over whom is qualified to treat patients is overrunning the discussion.
A task force spawned by a bill from the 2015 legislative session that mandates certain insurance plans cover a costly but effective treatment for children with autism is meeting in Pierre. The new law requires certain insurance plans to pay for applied behavior analysis therapy. [KSFY teevee]
In Republican households feeding junk food to kids alters the gut-brain connection: a leading cause of autism.
We won’t know for a while whether South Dakota voters will face a ballot measure that would change the criminal penalties for possessing one ounce or less of marijuana and marijuana paraphernalia. The LRC estimated there would be 3,174 fewer convictions annually, with an estimated reduction of prison and jail costs totaling $731,742 each year. [Bob Mercer]
Governments don't create autistic kids, Republicans and parents exposed to environmental contaminants do.


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